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Lining up texture locators

Most people think that Texture Locators are just those widgets that get in the way while you're trying to work on your scene, but James Darknell takes some time to explain how they work and offers a different way to quickly align them to your item's surface.

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How to create condensation

Description

In November 2014, I had the privilege of organising and attending the SWEDEN LOVES MODO event in Gothenburg. I learnt a lot that day, but the one thing I took away and wanted to be able to reproduce when I got back home was an example from a presentation by Paulo Madeira on how to quickly create condensation / water droplets on the outside of an object, like say, on a can of coke. 

Now, if you have tried this exercise yourself before (or using a preset from the Asset Share site), you'll probably recall that it took a lot of resources, and your render times probably went through the roof. Paulo's method takes all those headaches away with a few clever tricks he's come up with. 

Step-by-Step
 

In Paulo's example, he used the Chameleon preset that comes with MODO. So for the purpose of this exercise, we will too and assume you have setup your environment and lighting. 

  • Drag in the Chameleon mesh preset.
  • In the Shader tree, delete the preset textures that came in with the mesh, but keep just the 'Chameleon on Branch' folder.
  • Create a new material and set it to a vibrant colour.
  • Right-click and duplicate the Chameleon Item Mesh and rename it Droplets.
  • Apply a white material to the Droplets mesh and call it Condensation.

As there are now two meshes located in exactly the same space, turn off the original Chameleon. You will then see just the droplets material.

  • Inside the Condensation material, go to Add Layer and insert the Pebbles texture (under Enhance:MODO Textures, Noise, Pebbles). The white areas will be where the droplets will appear on the mesh.
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    To resize the droplets, go to the Texture Location tab under properties, and change Size X, Y, Z to 15 mm each.
  • Under the Condensation Material change the Displacement Distance to 2 mm.
  • Change the effect of the Pebble texture from Diffuse Color to Displacement.
The Pebble texture covers the entire mesh, however, you only want the droplets themselves to be visible, so you will need to make those parts that are not actual bubbles, invisible (i.e. the areas which lie flat against the skin).
  • Duplicate the Pebbles texture, Invert it, and then change the Effect from Displacement to Stencil.
  • With the Pebbles/Stencil effect texture selected, under the Texture Layers tab, increase the Bias to 100% to make the transition of the edges of each droplet sharper so that they touch the skin surface.
  • Turn on the Chameleon mesh to view the results so far.
  • To make the droplets transparent, apply a Water preset material (i.e. remove any displacement or bump layers) to the Condensation material. Drag it below the two pebbles textures.
  • Change the Displacement Distance to 2 mm
To make the Chameleon metallic like Paulo did, change the material to 0% Diffuse, check Conserve Energy, Specular 20%, reflections 80%, check Blurry reflections.
URL  https://youtu.be/aOoUJP94QEo
Source (Sergio) Paulo Madeira (Madeira3D)
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Texture Bombing - Single Texture

Description

Tileable textures work for some jobs, but sometimes you need your surface to appear seamless, especially when you have expansive scenes of natural elements like grass, stone and sand. That's when texture replicators come in handy.  

Instead of tiling an image across a plane, the texture replicators new to modo 601 allows you to place a small copy of the image at each vertex. From there you can randomly scale, rotate and blend them to make the surface appear seamless.

Here is a simple example that will hopefully get you on the right path, however if it doesn't address all of your questions, maybe the video links below will.

Preparation

It's assumed that you already have your terrain or whatever mesh item you wish to apply your texture to.

Step-by-Step

    Apply texture
    • Select your mesh, apply a material.
    • With the material selected> Add Layer > Image Map > Load Image of your grass, dirt or other preferred texture.
    Correct Gamma
    • Under > Properties > Texture Layers > Gamma, divide the gamma 1.0 by 2.2 = .4546
    Adjust Gamma
    Increase Wrap
    • Under > Properties > Texture Locator > Projection, increase both Horizontal & Vertical Wraps so that they appear tiled. Try 10 x 10 (but it really depends on the texture you are using)
    • Note: Make sure you have the Render Preview Window open, as texture replicators do not show up in the Open GL viewport.
    Texture Replicator
    • Under > Properties > Texture Locator > Texture Replicator > Particle Source, select the mesh item you wish to apply the image map to.
    • Increase the Particle Size so that each image is almost touching
    • Adjust the Falloff Bias and Gain so that the mess is totally and evenly covered.
    • Adjust the Random Size, Rotation and Random Rotation as required.
    Texture Replicator settings

Source

James has recorded two videos on Texture Replicators. The first shows how to make a seamless grass plane, and the second explains texture bombing where you use multiple texture images under a single material.

Author  

MutantPixel (James Darknell)

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Texture Bombing using multiple images

Description

Regular textures like the ones shown above are adequate for most jobs, but occasionally you may want to mix it up a bit and create something a little more unique, yet still make it look organic.

So for example, say I wanted to use the grass, rocks and sand above to create a random terrain image. Now, I could go into Photoshop and create a mashup of these three textures, but once I'm back in modo, if I had to cover an expansive area, I'd still have to contend with the tiling issue, and in the real-world, having tiled rocks and grass just doesn't cut it. That's where texture bombing comes in.

Texture bombing is a procedural technique that helps reduce regular pattern artefacts. We do this by first placing a bunch of different textures into a Group, and then using modo's Texture Replicators, a small copy of one of the Group's images is randomly placed at each vertex across the mesh. From there you can further randomly scale, rotate, and blend the textures together to make the surface appear seamless and quite natural-looking. 

Preparation It's assumed that you've already created your mesh item that you wish to apply your textures to.
Step-by-Step

    Apply texture
    • Select your mesh, apply a material.
    • With the material selected> Add Layer > Image Map > Load Image and bring in several different images. I'm using grass, rocks and sand.
    Correct Gamma
    • Selecting all the texture images at one, under > Properties > Texture Layers > Gamma, divide the gamma 1.0 by 2.2 = .4546
    Adjust Gamma
    Increase Wrap
    • Under > Properties > Texture Locator > Projection, increase both Horizontal & Vertical Wraps so that they appear tiled. Try 10 x 10 (but it really depends on the texture you are using)
    Create Group of textures
    • From the Shader Tree, select all the texture map images you want to use in your 'texture bomb'
    Create Group
    • Go to the > Group tab > New Group, name your group and leave it as Standard
    Create Group
     Replace current image with the Group
    • Under > Properties > Texture Layers > Image, change it to the Group you just created
    IMage Group
    Note: Make sure you have the Render Preview Window open, as texture replicators do not show up in the Open GL viewport.
    Texture Replicator
    • Under > Properties > Texture Locator > Texture Replicator > Particle Source, select the mesh item you wish to apply the image map to.
    • Increase the Particle Size so that each image is almost touching
    • Adjust the Falloff Bias and Gain so that the mess is totally and evenly covered.
    • Adjust the Random Size, Rotation and Random Rotation as required.
    Create Group

And this is a quick and dirty random terrain texture created with the three images at the top of the page.

Create Group
Source

James has recorded two videos on Texture Replicators. The first shows how to make a seamless grass plane, and the second explains texture bombing where you use multiple texture images under a single material.

Author  

MutantPixel (James Darknell)

Related Images:

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Making your own tileable textures

Description

Making your own unique tileable textures is not all that difficult or time consuming and you don't even need to go out to photoshop. In fact, it can all be done within modo using the paint tools, and you can do it in less than 5 minutes!

Assumptions

That you are already familiar with modo's UV mapping and painting tools. (But if not, and you have any questions, please leave a comment below)

Step-by-Step
    • Create a flat plane 3 x 3
    • Create a new UV map using Barycentric projection  UV > UV Projection Tool > Barycentric 
    • Switch to the Paint tab
    • Create a blank texture  > Texture > Add blank colour texture 
    • Start painting your design. No matter what pattern you create it will be tillable!
    • Remember to save your image out > File > Save Image
Barycentric projection
Author Yazan Malkosh
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