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Tag: James Darknell

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Lining up texture locators

Most people think that Texture Locators are just those widgets that get in the way while you're trying to work on your scene, but James Darknell takes some time to explain how they work and offers a different way to quickly align them to your item's surface.

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Numeric Entry Field Tips

One of the handiest things you can use in your everyday workflow is the versatile way you can approach entering numbers into MODO. Here in this video, James Darknell explains a variety of ways that even many MODO experts are unaware of.

http://community.thefoundry.co.uk/tv/training/view.aspx?id=659

I particularly like the Gang Edit. ūüôā

In addition to being able to edit the number fields by typing in numbers, users can gang edit all three fields simultaneously by LMB+Clicking the icon to the left of the mini-slider enabling the feature.

Gang-edit

 

INDEPENDENT - The default is i 'Independent', controls are edited independently.

COPY - The first click changes the field = 'Copy', will make whatever you type into the first field, the same in the other two fields.

PROPORTIONAL - The second¬†click changes to ‚ąě (infinity)¬†'Proportional' where value changes are applied proportionally to all like controls.

RELATIVE - The third click changes to + 'Relative', the value change is added to all like controls. For instance if you divided the first field by /2 the other two fields would recalculate dividing by two as well.

When entering numeric values, you can use keyboard equivalents as well, such as;

'Ctrl'+'Alt'+'Enter'for Copy

'Ctrl'+'Enter' for Proportional

'Alt'+'Enter' for Relative

 

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Texture Bombing - Single Texture

Description

Tileable textures work for some jobs, but sometimes you need your surface to appear seamless, especially when you have expansive scenes of natural elements like grass, stone and sand. That's when texture replicators come in handy.  

Instead of tiling an image across a plane, the texture replicators new to modo 601 allows you to place a small copy of the image at each vertex. From there you can randomly scale, rotate and blend them to make the surface appear seamless.

Here is a simple example that will hopefully get you on the right path, however if it doesn't address all of your questions, maybe the video links below will.

Preparation

It's assumed that you already have your terrain or whatever mesh item you wish to apply your texture to.

Step-by-Step

    Apply texture
    • Select your mesh, apply a material.
    • With the material selected> Add Layer > Image Map > Load Image¬†of your grass, dirt or other preferred texture.
    Correct Gamma
    • Under > Properties > Texture Layers > Gamma, divide the gamma 1.0 by 2.2 = .4546
    Adjust Gamma
    Increase Wrap
    • Under > Properties > Texture Locator > Projection, increase both¬†Horizontal & Vertical Wraps so that they appear tiled. Try 10 x 10 (but it really depends on the texture you are using)
    • Note:¬†Make sure you have the Render Preview Window open, as texture replicators do not show up in the Open GL viewport.
    Texture Replicator
    • Under > Properties > Texture Locator > Texture Replicator > Particle Source, select the mesh item you wish to apply the image map to.
    • Increase the Particle Size so that each image is almost touching
    • Adjust the Falloff Bias and Gain so that the mess is totally and evenly covered.
    • Adjust the Random Size, Rotation and Random Rotation as required.
    Texture Replicator settings

Source

James has recorded two videos on Texture Replicators. The first shows how to make a seamless grass plane, and the second explains texture bombing where you use multiple texture images under a single material.

Author  

MutantPixel (James Darknell)

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9.6/105votes
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Texture Bombing using multiple images

Description

Regular textures like the ones shown above are adequate for most jobs, but occasionally you may want to mix it up a bit and create something a little more unique, yet still make it look organic.

So for example, say I wanted to use the grass, rocks and sand above to create a random terrain image. Now, I could go into Photoshop and create a mashup of these three textures, but once I'm back in modo, if I had to cover an expansive area, I'd still have to contend with the tiling issue, and in the real-world, having tiled rocks and grass just doesn't cut it. That's where texture bombing comes in.

Texture bombing is a procedural technique that helps reduce regular pattern artefacts. We do this by first placing a bunch of different textures into a Group, and then using modo's Texture Replicators, a small copy of one of the Group's images is randomly placed at each vertex across the mesh. From there you can further randomly scale, rotate, and blend the textures together to make the surface appear seamless and quite natural-looking. 

Preparation It's assumed that you've already created your mesh item that you wish to apply your textures to.
Step-by-Step

    Apply texture
    • Select your mesh, apply a material.
    • With the material selected> Add Layer > Image Map > Load Image and bring in several different images. I'm using grass, rocks and sand.
    Correct Gamma
    • Selecting all the texture images at one, under > Properties > Texture Layers > Gamma, divide the gamma 1.0 by 2.2 = .4546
    Adjust Gamma
    Increase Wrap
    • Under > Properties > Texture Locator > Projection, increase both¬†Horizontal & Vertical Wraps so that they appear tiled. Try 10 x 10 (but it really depends on the texture you are using)
    Create Group of textures
    • From the Shader Tree, select all the texture map images you want to use in your 'texture bomb'
    Create Group
    • Go to the > Group tab¬†> New Group, name your group and leave it as Standard
    Create Group
     Replace current image with the Group
    • Under > Properties > Texture Layers > Image, change it to the Group you just created
    IMage Group
    Note: Make sure you have the Render Preview Window open, as texture replicators do not show up in the Open GL viewport.
    Texture Replicator
    • Under > Properties > Texture Locator > Texture Replicator > Particle Source, select the mesh item you wish to apply the image map to.
    • Increase the Particle Size so that each image is almost touching
    • Adjust the Falloff Bias and Gain so that the mess is totally and evenly covered.
    • Adjust the Random Size, Rotation and Random Rotation as required.
    Create Group

And this is a quick and dirty random terrain texture created with the three images at the top of the page.

Create Group
Source

James has recorded two videos on Texture Replicators. The first shows how to make a seamless grass plane, and the second explains texture bombing where you use multiple texture images under a single material.

Author  

MutantPixel (James Darknell)

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9.7/103votes
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Do you get gamma?

Problem

When applying images to a surface, they may appear in the rendered frame as being a bit too light or washed out. This is because modo always renders internally at gamma 1.0 (linearly), and then applies the user's specified output gamma when displaying or saving the rendered result. 

Bitmapped images typically have automatic gamma applied to them in an image editor or digital camera (otherwise, they would look too dark to most users); and because of this, rendering with modo’s default gamma value (2.2) will make your images appear light or washed out as they have received double gamma. Therefore, it is important to de-gamma your images. 

GammaComparison
Solution

This can be done by inverting the gamma amount, simply by dividing the Render Output gamma amount, whatever it may be (but 2.2 is the default), by the image map's item 1.0 value.

This can be done directly in the value input field using mathematical shorthand. For instance users can simply type ‚Äú1.0/2.2‚ÄĚ into the dialog box and press enter, and it will return the value ‚Äú0.4546‚ÄĚ (modo does the math for you!). Now the rendered image will produce the correct result.¬†

 

And if you are interested in a general understanding of gamma and how it works on your computer, Richard Yot has made this video that might fill in some of the gaps.

Source  modo 601 User Guide
Author  James Darknell (MutantPixel)

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