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USER INTERFACE & IO

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Lining up texture locators

Most people think that Texture Locators are just those widgets that get in the way while you're trying to work on your scene, but James Darknell takes some time to explain how they work and offers a different way to quickly align them to your item's surface.

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Numeric Entry Field Tips

One of the handiest things you can use in your everyday workflow is the versatile way you can approach entering numbers into MODO. Here in this video, James Darknell explains a variety of ways that even many MODO experts are unaware of.

http://community.thefoundry.co.uk/tv/training/view.aspx?id=659

I particularly like the Gang Edit. ūüôā

In addition to being able to edit the number fields by typing in numbers, users can gang edit all three fields simultaneously by LMB+Clicking the icon to the left of the mini-slider enabling the feature.

Gang-edit

 

INDEPENDENT - The default is i 'Independent', controls are edited independently.

COPY - The first click changes the field = 'Copy', will make whatever you type into the first field, the same in the other two fields.

PROPORTIONAL - The second¬†click changes to ‚ąě (infinity)¬†'Proportional' where value changes are applied proportionally to all like controls.

RELATIVE - The third click changes to + 'Relative', the value change is added to all like controls. For instance if you divided the first field by /2 the other two fields would recalculate dividing by two as well.

When entering numeric values, you can use keyboard equivalents as well, such as;

'Ctrl'+'Alt'+'Enter'for Copy

'Ctrl'+'Enter' for Proportional

'Alt'+'Enter' for Relative

 

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Resize the camera icon

If you add an object, sometimes that camera just is a little too big for the scene, especially when getting in close. Or by the same token, if you've got a really large object, your camera is almost invisible; it's too tiny. So under the Display, with that camera selected, there is the Size. This is the view size; it's not the actual size of your renderer or anything else--it's the size of the camera icon. 

Resize camera icon to relative

So you can change that depending on your scene, and what I've often told people is just set it to 0 and it stays relative to your zoom. So notice the camera pretty much stays the same size, whether you zoom in or out, and that's really kind of nice. So I always know where it is. If I zoom out really far, my objects are hard to see, but because I have this size set to 0, I can always find my camera. So, something to think about when you are building larger scenes.

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Making facial deformations using weight maps

Video Date March 8, 2006
Area Covered

In repsonse to a question I received today, here's an old video that I found which explains how to use MODO's tool pipe to paint soft selections.

Greg shows how to add a Weight Map to a face, and then paints areas such as the nose and eyebrows so they can be deformed.

Author Greg Leuenberg - Sabpro
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Focusing your camera using Autofocus and Depth of Field

Description

If you're a photographer, when it comes to setting up your cameras for rendering in modo, you'll no doubt understand aperture sizes, what 'depth of field' is, and what F-stops are. But some of us who don't have a feel for these numbers need to eyeball things in order to get them how we want. In this Lux TV video from some time back, Brad shows how to access the advanced feature in the modo toolpipe allowing you to display extra handles to position the camera when using depth of field. He also shows how you can click on a point anywhere within a scene and have the camera focus there automatically.

Step-by-Step
    Advanced camera handles
    • In the Perspective viewport, select your camera and activate the transform tool (W)
    • Then in the Toolpipe, right-click the '=' sign in the 'V' column and select Advanced
    Activate Tool Handles
    • You'll see some extra handles appear on the camera that will allow you to drag and focus
 
    Autofocus under mouse
    • In the Render viewport, position your mouse on the spot where you want your camera to focus
    • Click Ctrl-F and the camera will fire the 'camera.autofocusUnderMouse' command
Source  You can watch a video that details the process here
Author  Brad Peebler
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